antiques
Best articles about oldest civilizations
8
Apr

Roman Artifacts Discovered During Access Road Construction

Posted in News  by antiques

roman-artifacts-discovered-during-access-road-constructionPieces of the past have been unearthed during the first stages of construction of the East Kent Access Road.

Archaeologists have found artefacts dating from when the Romans inhabited Thanet, as well from other periods.

The finds from the recent excavations were shown to isle residents at two roadshows from the Trust for Thanet Archaelogy over the weekend.

The first took place at Margate library on Saturday, and the second at Westwood Cross on Sunday.

Shoppers thronged around the stall outside Debenhams to look at what has been found so far. Read the rest of this entry »

8
Apr

Serbia – the Land Where 18 Roman Emperors Were Born

Posted in News  by antiques

serbia-e28093-the-land-where-18-roman-emperors-were-bornThe mention of Serbia usually brings to mind the bloody break-up of Yugoslavia in the 1990s, but rarely ever the Roman Empire - despite the fact that 18 Roman rulers, one fifth of all emperors, were born on its territory.

With that in mind, archaeologist Miomir Korac has launched The Road of Roman Emperors in Serbia (Itinerarium Romanum Serbiae) - a project meant to combine dozens of antique places across the country into a 600-kilometre-long tourist itinerary.

‘This is perhaps the most important project in Serbia because it is a chance to show the country’s pretty face and earn money,’ Korac, the head of the Viminacium archaeological site, told the German Press Agency dpa. Read the rest of this entry »

8
Apr

Researchers Discover 10,000yo Native Oasis

Posted in News  by antiques

researchers-discover-10000yo-native-oasisThousands of years before Euro-Americans “discovered” the bubbling mudpots and eruptive geysers of what is now Yellowstone National Park, early Americans were spending part of their summer camping in the Yellowstone Lake area.

“It’s always been a destination resort,” said Elaine Hale, park archaeologist. “For at least 10,000 years people have been using the lake area.”

Thanks to archaeological digs around Yellowstone Lake last summer by University of Montana assistant archaeology professor Douglas MacDonald and 13 graduate and undergrad students, park officials are now getting a broader picture of early human use of the lake area.

“The lake may have served as a crossroads of sorts for Native Americans from multiple regions,” MacDonald said. Read the rest of this entry »

8
Apr

Roman Emperor Octavian Augustus Was Crowned as Egyptian Pharaoh

Posted in News  by antiques

roman-emperor-octavian-augustus-was-crowned-as-egyptian-pharaohScholars translating a Roman victory stele, erected in the Temple of Isis at Philae in Egypt in 29 BC, have discovered the Roman Emperor Octavian Augustus’ name inscribed in a cartouche – an honour normally reserved for an Egyptian pharaoh

Octavian’s forces defeated Cleopatra VII and Mark Antony at the Battle of Actium in 31 BC, and captured Alexandria soon afterwards. Historians believe that although Octavian ruled Egypt after the death of Cleopatra in 30 BC, he was never actually crowned as an Egyptian pharaoh.

The stele was commissioned by Gaius Cornelius Gallus, a Roman soldier and poet who was appointed by Octavian to run Egypt as a province, and who administered Egypt until he was recalled to Rome in 27 BC. The stele celebrates the end of the Ptolemaic kings and the defeat of the “king of the Ethiopians”. It is written in three languages: Egyptian hieroglyphics, Latin and Greek. Read the rest of this entry »

8
Apr

Researchers Study Unknown Human Species from the Siberian Mountains

Posted in News  by antiques

researchers-study-unknown-human-species-from-the-siberian-mountainsHave scientists identified a “homo incognitus” — a previously unknown human species? Finger bones dating from 30,000 years ago were unearthed in southern Siberia. Its genes differ from those of modern humans as well as Neanderthals, and German scientists think they are onto a sensation.

John Krause checked his findings again and again. Somehow he couldn’t believe what the analysis was showing. The scientist wanted to make sure he was right before phoning his boss, the renowned evolutionary genetics specialist Svante Pääbo. Did the DNA really stem from a previously unknown human form?

The Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig had just 30 milligrams of bone powder available to carry out its genetic analysis. From that sample, Krause and his colleagues isolated the DNA of a primitive human who had lived anywhere between 30,000 and 48,000 years ago in the Denisova Cave in the Altai Mountains of southern Siberia. Read the rest of this entry »

8
Apr

Archaeologists Are Looking for Roots of Religious Faith on Mt. Fuji

Posted in News  by antiques

archaeologists-look-for-roots-of-religious-faith-on-mt-fujiAn excavation project is under way on Mt. Fuji, searching for the roots of religious faith involving this national symbol.

A three-year enterprise begun in fiscal 2009 by Yamanashi Prefecture’s Archaeological Cultural Properties Center, the project is seeking to find out when Mt. Fuji became a place of worship for laypeople as well as priests.

Climbing Mt. Fuji to perform religious devotions is known to have become popular among laypeople living near the capital during the Edo period (1603-1867). However, items recently unearthed on the mountain suggest such “climber-worshippers” may have established a base there much earlier.

Excavation began last year at Fuji Omuro Sengen Jinja shrine in Fuji Kawaguchikomachi, Yamanashi Prefecture, located at the second station from the Fuji Yoshida entrance to Mt. Fuji. Read the rest of this entry »

8
Apr

Old Assyrian Fortress City Could Fall into Tigris River

Posted in News  by antiques

old-assyrian-fortress-city-could-fall-into-tigris-riverA 4,500-year-old fortress city, the first capital of ancient Iraq’s Assyrian civilisation, is in danger of falling into Iraq’s Tigris River, an antiquities official warned Monday.

The archaeologist, from the antiquities department for central Iraq’s Salah al-Din province, said the river has already washed away more than 30 metres of the ancient city of Assur, the religious capital of ancient Iraq’s Assyrian civilisation.

‘This season, the river washed away dozens of clay tablets and statues because there is no protective flood wall,’ Mohammed al- Jabouri told the German Press Agency dpa.

The ruined city, now known as Qalah Sharqat, or ‘Castle of Earth,’ dates back to 2,500 BC. It was named for its patron god, Assur, who also gave the Assyrian civilisation its name. Read the rest of this entry »

8
Apr

The Oldest Man-Made Construction Ever Found Discovered in Greece

Posted in News  by antiques

the-oldest-man-made-construction-ever-found-discovered-in-greeceThe oldest known example of a man-made structure was found within a prehistoric cave in central Greece, according to the Greek culture ministry.

The structure is a stone wall that blocked two-thirds of the entrance to the Theopetra cave near Kalambaka on the north edge of the Thessalian plain. It was constructed 23,000 years ago, probably as a barrier to cold winds.

“An optical dating test, known as Optically Stimulated Luminescence, was applied on quartz grains nested within the stones. We dated four different samples from the sediment and soil materials, and all provided identical dates,” Nikolaos Zacharias, director of the laboratory of archaeometry at the University of Peloponnese, told Discovery News. Read the rest of this entry »

8
Apr

Archaeologists Discover Evidence of Modern Human Appearance

Posted in News  by antiques

archaeologists-discover-evidence-of-modern-human-appearanceNew findings from an excavation site in Spain are generating heated debate among palaeontologists and archaeologists about precisely when the Neanderthals disappeared and were replaced by the first anatomically modern human beings.

The research, carried out by a team from the Centre for Prehistoric Archaeological Heritage Studies at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, and published in the Journal of Human Evolution, pinpoints the transition to between 34,000 and 32,000 years ago, and supports the hypothesis that that the two species did not interact or coexist.

The archaeologists carried out their research at a site called Cova Gran in the south-eastern Pyrenees in Catalonia, Spain, that was inhabited by Neanderthals and modern humans at different times in the past.

Covering a total surface area of 2,500 square metres, Cova Gran is a rarity for archaeologists; sites of this ‘transitionary’ type are crucial to palaeontologists and archaeologists as they offer them a chance to trace the development of the human species. Read the rest of this entry »

8
Apr

Researchers Find 30,000yo Secrets from Kauri Trees

Posted in News  by antiques

researchers-find-30000yo-secrets-from-kauri-treesOxford University is involved in a research project to unearth 30,000 year old climate records, before they are lost forever.

The rings of preserved kauri trees, hidden in New Zealand’s peat bogs, hold the secret to climate fluctuations spanning back to the end of the last Ice Age.

The team, led by Exeter University, has been awarded a grant from the Natural Environment Research Council to carry out carbon dating and other analyses of the kauri tree rings.

The trees store an immense amount of information about rapid and extreme climate change in the past. For instance, wide ring widths are associated with cool dry summer conditions. The scientists believe their findings will help us understand what future climate change may bring. Read the rest of this entry »