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Best articles about oldest civilizations

Archive for the ‘Antique Egypt’ Category

2
Feb

The Lifestyles of the Wealthy People of Egypt

Posted in Antique Egypt  by antiques

the-lifestyles-of-the-wealthy-people-of-egyptThe rich and famous people of ancient Egypt lived a decadent lifestyle with fine wine, sex, high fashion, and plenty of partying. How do they compare with their equivalents today - the modern western celebrity set?

The main differences might be regarding who were the richest people then, and who are the richest people now. In ancient Egypt the pharaoh was at the top of the ‘pyramid’ and his family, noble people who owned land, and the priests came after. Scribes, architects and doctors were well off, and skilled craftsmen also had many privileges.

Peasants and unskilled workers were low down the scale of Egyptian society, but it was the servants and slaves that skirted the bottom of the class pyramid. Those working in mines and quarries were really asking for trouble, as diseases, physical strain and dangers lurked in every turned stone in the desert. Slaves working in rich domestic environments were the lucky ones as they were assured security, housing and food. Many of these endured hard physical work and usually died young as we can see from the osteological remains found at Amarna site analyzed by Dr. Jerome Rose which proved that people building those megalomaniac buildings for Akhenaton died young with severe bone lesions. Read the rest of this entry »

27
Sep

The History and Culture of Alexandria

Posted in Antique Egypt  by antiques

alexandria-anciet-drawingAlexandria is the shining pearl of the Mediterranean, and the beacon radiating its culture and heritage to the world at large. It is the second largest city and the main port of Egypt, History of Alexandria tells us that Alexandria was founded by the Macedonian leader Alexander the Great in 332 BC. Alexandria. It was built by the Greek architect Dinocrates (332-331 BC) on the site of an old village, Rhakotis, at the orders of Alexander the Great. History of Alexandria can be divided into several epochs.

Alexandria during the Ptolemies

Alexandria was the renowned capital of the Ptolemies, with numerous monuments. History of Alexandria took a tragic turn at the time of Cleopatra, Julius Caesar, Mark Antony, and Octavian. Read the rest of this entry »

8
Aug

North Pyramid - the largest of the three major pyramids located at the Dahshur necropolis

Posted in Antique Egypt  by antiques

north-pyramid-the-largest-of-the-three-major-pyramids-located-at-the-dahshur-necropolisThe Red Pyramid, also called the North Pyramid is the largest of the three major pyramids located at the Dahshur necropolis. Named for the light crimson hue of its exposed granite surface, it is also the third largest Egyptian pyramid, after those of Khufu and Khafra at Giza. At the time of its completion, it was the tallest man-made structure in the world. It is also believed to be the world’s first successful attempt at constructing a “true” smooth-sided pyramid.

The Red Pyramid was not always red. It used to be cased with white Tura limestone, but only a few of these now remain at the pyramid’s base on the corner. During the Middle Ages much of white Tura limestone was taken for buildings in Cairo, revealing the reddish pinkish limestone.

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8
Aug

About 110 Pyramids Currently Known in Egypt

Posted in Antique Egypt  by antiques

about-110-pyramids-currently-known-in-egypt1There are about 110 pyramids currently known in Egypt, many in a state of great disrepair and almost unrecognisable. Some were built as burial places for kings and others for queens. A pyramid also may have represented a stairway for the king to ascend to the heavens. Another possibility is that it was symbolic of the primeval mound on which the sun god/creator was born.

How the Egyptians managed the complex organisation of labour and the physical movement of large stone blocks is still a matter for debate. Pyramid construction may have involved ramps being erected around the pyramid. Blocks of stone would have been pulled up on sledges and the ramps dismantled later. It is believed that most of the labour for the construction of the pyramids would have come from farmers who were available during the inundation season when the Nile River flooded and farmland was underwater. It would also have been an ideal time for the transportation by boat of large stone blocks from their quarries to the pyramid sites.

The earliest pyramid was the Step Pyramid of king Djoser of the Old Kingdom’s 3rd Dynasty over 4,600 years ago. The pyramid was the largest structure ever erected at Saqqara, the necropolis that overlooked the ancient capital of Memphis. Its construction was initially in the form of a low mastaba tomb upon which extra levels were gradually added to give it a step-like appearance.

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6
Aug

A Research of Late Antique Egypt

Posted in Antique Egypt  by antiques

the-research-of-late-antique-egyptThe study of late antiquity from the fourth to the seventh century A.D. has attracted the attention of a growing number of scholars in the past twenty years. Late antiquity is indeed an attractive field of study, because its society was in many ways comparable to our own. Scholars have always stressed the ever-growing bureaucracy and the increasing importance of professional services in the economy of late antiquity as developments parallel to what was going on in their own society. However, growing inefficiency in government and a decline in the economy as a whole seem particularly apt parallels to our day and age. In late antiquity the public response to the problems facing the Roman empire was unable to prevent its fall.

Late antiquity is also an attractive field of study because its society was in some ways different from our own. The insistence on theological correctness, the prominent role of the holy men and women in society, the careful use of expressions and titles of respect when people addressed one another, and the formal hierarchy in all walks of life are unfamiliar to us. Yet in a time of rapid change the study of civilizations with roots radically different from ours can provide an interesting form of reorientation.
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