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25
Feb

New Archaeological Sites Found in India Can Unveil the Life of Ancient People

Posted in Uncategorized  by antiques

new-archaeological-sites-found-in-india-can-unveil-the-life-of-ancient-peopleNewly discovered archaeological sites in southern and northern India have revealed how people lived before and after the colossal Toba volcanic eruption 74,000 years ago, according to Press Trust of India (PTI) on Tuesday.

The international and multidisciplinary research team, led by Oxford University in collaboration with Indian institutions, has uncovered what it calls ‘Pompeii-like excavations’ beneath the Toba ash.

The seven-year project examines the environment that humans lived in, their stone tools, as well as the plants and animal bones of the time.

“This suggests that human populations were present in India prior to 74,000 years ago, or about 15,000 years earlier than expected based on some genetic clocks,” said project director Michael Petraglia, Senior Research Fellow in the School of Archaeology at the University of Oxford. Read the rest of this entry »

14
Feb

X-ray Finds Roman Urn

Posted in Uncategorized  by antiques

x-ray-finds-roman-urnTHE Romans had something to declare at Exeter Airport – 2,000 years after they arrived in Devon.

Passing through customs was a very old pot that the visitors had left behind during their stay in the county some time in the mid-70s AD.

The black-burnished urn was dug up during an archaeological dig in Cullompton and since then everyone has been wondering what was in it.

Rather than put a hand in and root about inside or hold it upside down and scatter the contents on the table, the pot was sent along to the airport which has a big X-ray machine usually devoted to ensuring airline passengers’ security.

Staff from Exeter’s Royal Albert Memorial Museum – whose own X-ray gear was a bit small for the job – gathered round to see what would be revealed. Read the rest of this entry »

15
Dec

Archaeologists Started Digging Around a 280-year-old Farmhouse

Posted in Uncategorized  by antiques

archaeologists-started-digging-around-a-280-year-old-farmhouseHistorians and archaeologists are doing surface excavation around a 280-year-old farmhouse near Seaford.

The Cannon-Maston House and surrounding property were purchased last summer by Sussex County and a land preservation group with the goal of opening it as a museum.

Peter Bon of the Archaeological Society of Delaware says the teams are looking for evidence of trading between Indians and the Cannon family, which built the house in 1727. He says that would have been a fairly early period for contact between Indians and colonists. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Nov

The History of the Near East - from 2,000 BC to 1,200 BC

Posted in Uncategorized  by antiques

the-history-of-the-near-east-from-2000-bc-to-1200-bcAs the great Sumerian empire that had stood for 1,500 years started to fall to the Amorites, the city of Isin broke free of the empire and claimed it’s independence.

Isin, together with the now Amorite ruled city of Larsa in the south, and Mari, Assur and Eshnunna in the west, formed the most powerful cities of this new Amorite period.

In the nineteenth century BC the cities of Assur and Nineveh joined to form an Assyrian kingdom, which went on to become the first Assyrian empire in 1869 BC when Shamshi-Adad, with the help of his 2 sons, conquered the cities of Mari, which had been the dominant city of the area, and Ekallutum. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Nov

Akkadian Language - Important Cultural Language in the World History

Posted in Uncategorized  by antiques

akkadian-language-important-cultural-language-in-the-world-historyAkkadian is one of the great cultural languages of world history. Akkadian (or Babylonian-Assyrian) is the collective name for the spoken languages of the culture in the three millennia BCE in Mesopotamia, the area between the rivers Euphrates and Tigris, approx. covering modern Irak. The name Akkadian –so called in ancient time– is derived from the city-state of Akkad, founded in the middle of the third millennium BCE and capital of one of the first great empires after the dawn of human history. The downfall of Akkad is described (in literary terms) in the curse of Akkad, but the name has continued to be used for millennia since. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Nov

Akkadian Empire - an Important Point in the History of Mesopotamia

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akkadian-empire-an-important-point-in-the-history-of-mesopotamiaThere are several reasons for taking the year 2350 as a turning point in the history of Mesopotamia. For the first time, an empire arose on Mesopotamian soil. The driving force of that empire was the Akkadians, so called after the city of Akkad, which Sargon chose for his capital (it has not yet been identified but was presumably located on the Euphrates between Sippar and Kish).

The name Akkad became synonymous with a population group that stood side by side with the Sumerians. Southern Mesopotamia became known as the “land of Sumer and Akkad”; Akkadian became the name of a language; and the arts rose to new heights. However, even this turning point was not the first time the Akkadians had emerged in history. Semites [whether Akkadians or a Semitic language group that had settled before them] may have had a part in the urbanization that took place at the end of the 4th millennium. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Nov

The History of Armenia from the mid 6th Century

Posted in Uncategorized  by antiques

the-history-of-armenia-from-the-mid-6th-centuryArmenia (Akkadian Uraštu; Old Persian Armina): ancient kingdom, situated along the river Araxes (modern Aras), the Upper Tigris and the Upper Euphrates.

Achaemenid Armenia

From the mid-sixth century onward, Armenia was a satrapy of the Achaemenid empire; how it had become part of the kingdom of the Persians, is unclear. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Nov

The History of the Ancient Arab Civilization

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the-history-of-the-ancient-arab-civilizationTHE ARABIAN PENINSULA

It is the largest of its kind in the world with an area of almost 900,000 sq miles. Although surrounded on three sides with water, its climate remains mostly rainless. With the exception of a few cultivable and fertile areas (Oases), most of this land is a scorching desert and steppe.

It is one of the driest and hottest regions of the world. Some of its western and south western areas can suffer extremely violent but short rainstorms, creating flash floods that can destroy all in its path: towns, humans, animals and vegetation. Immense as this land is, Arabia cannot boast a single important river. This type of natural adversity could only be put up with by a people who had to become fine- tuned, very hardy and adaptable to be able to survive such a hostile environment. This harshness is reflected in the very character of the Arabian, who looks upon anyone who is not of his tribe as an enemy. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Nov

Teotihuacan - Ancient Location in the Basin of Mexico

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teotihuacan-ancient-location-in-the-basin-of-mexicoTeotihuacan is an enormous archaeological site in the Basin of Mexico, containing some of the largest pyramidal structures built in the pre-Columbian Americas. Apart from the pyramidal structures, the archaeological site of Teotihuacan is also known for its large residential complexes, the so-called “street of the dead”, and its colorful well-preserved murals.

Teotihuacan was, at its apogee in the first half of the 1st millennium CE, the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. During its zenith it may have had more than 100,000 inhabitants placing it among the largest cities of the world in this period. The civilization and cultural complex associated with the site is also referred to as Teotihuacan or Teotihuacano. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Nov

The Olmecs - Earliest Civilization in Central America

Posted in Uncategorized  by antiques

the-olmecs-earliest-civilization-in-central-americaThe earliest civilization in Central America—and possibly the earliest civilization in the Americas—was the Olmec civilization which arose sometime between 1200 and 1000 BC. They originally lived in the Gulf Coast region of southern Mexico, but soon expanded into Guatemala.

Olmec society was very simple. It was essentially divided into two groups: the elite group lived in the small urban centers (towns, really) and the common people lived in the rural areas. The Olmecs were overwhelmingly an agricultural people. The elite lived off of the agriculture of the common people, but they probably didn’t rule over the agricultural populations. Instead, they carried out religious ceremonies centered in the towns and carried out commercial trade in luxury and artistic items. Read the rest of this entry »