antiques
Best articles about oldest civilizations

Archive for the ‘Vikings’ Category

23
Mar

Viking Town Could Be Found in Thetford

Posted in Vikings  by antiques

viking-town-could-be-found-in-thetfordArchaeologists hope to find signs of an old Viking town during excavations in Norfolk.

The dig at the Anchor Hotel in Bridge Street, Thetford, is being carried out ahead of a possible redevelopment of the area.

The proximity of the Little Ouse river means there is every likelihood of well preserved remains under the car park, Breckland District Council said.

It is expected the work will take up to six weeks, depending on what is found.

Plundered a monastery

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle recorded that a great invading Viking army built a camp at Thetford in 869AD, the council added. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Nov

Vikings’ Families in the Norse Era

Posted in Vikings  by antiques

vikings-families-in-the-norse-eraDuring the Norse era, multiple “families” lived in the same longhouse, working the same farm holding. This “grand family” played an important role in shaping Norse society and its laws and customs, and was the standard unit of society.

A household might consist not only several husband-and-wife couples (with one member of each couple typically related by blood to one member of every other couple) and their children, but also the families of servants and bondsmen. During this time, the typical household size was probably ten to twenty people. This household size suggests that at the end of the settlement era, Iceland had a population of about 60,000 people. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Nov

Trade in the Vikings Civilization

Posted in Vikings  by antiques

trade-in-the-vikings-civilizationNorse traders (and raiders) traveled extensively throughout the known world, bringing back to the Norse lands a wide variety of trade goods.

The capacity of Norse era cargo ships made it possible to trade not only in high value luxury items (such as silks and spices from the Far East), but also in more bulky, prosaic, every-day items.

Most of the trading was over short distances, to and from dozens of ports around the Scandinavian coasts. But a smaller number of international trading centers grew, attracting merchants from throughout Europe, the Arab states, and even Asia.

The map shows some of the major Norse trade routes, as well as a few of the important Norse trading centers, settlements, and navigational points. Read the rest of this entry »

15
Nov

Overview of the Phoenician History

Posted in Vikings  by antiques

overview-of-the-phoenician-history“The Just man shall flourish, like the Cedar of Lebanon shall he grow; planted in the house of the LORD, they will flourish in the courts of our God” (Ps 92:12). The Phoenician galley was built from precious Cedar wood. The rower’s are God’s people rowing towards the Third Millennium.

God created us, as He planted the Cedars of Lebanon, (Ps 104:16), to grow and flourish in His love, So that from a tiny seed, we might reach our full potential. Our Blessed Mother Mary nurtures us, just as she did her own Son, and guides us towards God’s plan for us.

Between the period of 1200 B.C. and 900 B.C. there was no major military power in Mesopotamia. Therefor smaller states like Phoenicia and the Hebrew kingdom were able to prosper. These kingdoms especially the Phoenicians started to trade throughout the Mediterranean region. Read the rest of this entry »

15
Nov

The History of the Vikings Since AD 976

Posted in Vikings  by antiques

the-history-of-the-vikings-since-ad-976Brian, known as Boru from his birthplace by the river Shannon, is the son of a small local ruler. His family gain power through their successful attacks on the Vikings. In 964 Brian’s elder brother asserts his dominance over the local Irish potentates, the royal dynasty of Munster.

Taking their famous stronghold, the rock of Cashel, he becomes accepted as king of Munster and as leader of resistance to the Vikings in southern Ireland. Brian succeeds him in both roles in 976.

Brian Boru successfully drives the Vikings from the Shannon. In 1002 he is accepted as high king of all Ireland. His final confrontation with the Norsemen follows a plot set in motion in 1013.

In 1013 the Norse king of Dublin spends Christmas in the Orkneys with another Viking ruler - the local earl. They hatch a scheme. The earl of the Orkneys will bring a fleet and army to Dublin, before Easter, to assist the Norse king in overwhelming the king of all Ireland, Brian Boru. Read the rest of this entry »

15
Nov

The Food and Diet Among Vikings

Posted in Vikings  by antiques

the-food-and-diet-among-vikingsThere is insufficient evidence to determine what Norsemen ate and how their food was prepared. While the raw materials and the cooking utensils are found in archaeological studies, the ways in which foodstuffs were combined, prepared, and presented are largely unknown. In addition, diet probably varied quite a bit across the Norse lands, depending on climate and available resources.

The best available guess is that Norse people primarily ate agricultural products raised on their own farms: meat from cattle, sheep, horses, pigs, goats, and poultry; cereals, such as barley, rye, oats, and (rarely) wheat; dairy produce, such as milk from cows, sheep, or goats, as well as cheese and butter; vegetables, such as peas, beans, cabbage, onions, and an assortment of herbs; and wild fruits, such as apples, pears, cherries, and berries. Sugar was unknown; the only available sweetener was wild honey. Read the rest of this entry »

15
Nov

Vikings’ Clothing

Posted in Vikings  by antiques

vikings-clothingWool and linen

Like most people in Europe at the time, the Vikings used wool more than anything else for making clothes. The Vikings brought sheep with them to the islands they settled in the North Atlantic for wool and meat.

“The Faeroe Islands” even means “the Sheep islands”. Clothes were spun and woven by the women. They also dyed the cloth with mineral and vegetable dyes of red, green, brown, yellow or blue.

Linen was also used for clothes. Even today you can find Viking Age place names in Scandinavia like “Lin-åker” (lin= linen/flax, åker= field). Read the rest of this entry »

15
Nov

The Farms of Houses of the Vikings - Part II

Posted in Vikings  by antiques

the-farms-of-houses-of-the-vikings-part-iiIn the summer months, livestock was driven to pastures at higher elevations, called sel (shieling). During this time, from mid-June through mid-October, most of the livewstock were left to forage freely, while milk cows and ewes were kept close so they could be milked every day. The raw milk from the animals was collected and processed in a shed on site, where the farm family, or their hired hands, lived during the summer while they tended the livestock. Read the rest of this entry »

15
Nov

The Farms of Houses of the Vikings - Part I

Posted in Vikings  by antiques

the-farms-of-houses-of-the-vikings-part-iThe vast majority of Norse people lived on small farms. However, the nature of these settlements varied widely from one region to another. In prosperous regions, farms tended to cluster into small villages or hamlets. In less prosperous areas, individual farms were well separated.

Typical farm settlements took the form of a central cluster of buildings enclosed by fences. Outside the fenced areas were the fields used for cultivation or grazing. Each homestead typically consisted of a longhouse and multiple out-buildings. Read the rest of this entry »

15
Nov

The History of the Vikings from the 8th Century

Posted in Vikings  by antiques

the-history-of-the-vikingsThe Vikings: 8th - 10th century AD

In 793 the monks on the island of Lindisfarne, off the northeast coast of England, are unpleasantly surprised by the arrival of violent raiders from the sea. Their misfortune is the first clearly dated event in the saga of the Vikings - the last and most dramatic exodus in the long story of migration from Scandinavia, the original home of the Goths and Vandals.

The word Viking is Scandinavian for ‘pirate’, and it accurately describes the Norsemen who for two centuries raid the coasts of Britain and of northwest France. Read the rest of this entry »