antiques
Best articles about oldest civilizations
23
Mar

Archaeologists Discover World’s Oldest Temple in Turkey

Posted in News  by antiques

archaeologists-discover-worlds-oldest-temple-in-turkeyArchaeologists say a temple being excavated in southeastern Turkey is 12,000 years old and is likely the oldest temple ever uncovered.

The site was first identified in 1986 when a farmer tilling his field in Sanliurfa found a statuette in the soil, the Radikal newspaper reported Wednesday.

Since then, archaeologists have uncovered the foundation of the temple built in the Neolithic Age along with carvings of pigs, foxes, snakes, fawns and headless humans.

Officials with the Harran University Archaeology Department have yet to identify the culture that built the temple or their belief system, the newspaper said.

German teams were the first to excavate beginning in 1995, but the Turkish Culture and Tourism Ministry placed the site on its first-degree protection list in 2005, taking control of the research. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

Panauti Excavation to Bring More Clues on Medieval Nepal

Posted in News  by antiques

panauti-excavation-to-bring-more-clues-on-medieval-nepalThe ongoing excavation of ruins of a 14th century power-broker´s palace in Panauti, Kavre, has once again made researchers look afresh at the history of Nepali politics, which is profusely marked by conspiracy theories.

The Department of Archaeology (DOA) started the excavation in Panauti Municipality-7 at a point from where historians say the Bardhan family controlled for more than 100 years the central rule in medieval Nepal based in Kathmandu Valley.

This is the third time over six years that the excavation at a much encroached public junction has resumed. “If we complete the excavation and conserve it properly, it will create a new vantage point for looking at medieval history, and become a unique monument,” said Uddhav Acharya, an archaeologist undertaking the excavation.

According to Dinesh Raj Pant, a historian renowned for his research, the Bardhan family appears to have been awesome power-brokers in the 14th century. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

Interesting Discoveries Made in Logas Region, Greece

Posted in News  by antiques

interesting-discoveries-made-in-logas-region-greeceThe riverside region of Logas, in Elati, northwest Greece, was a residential settlement until the Hellenistic Period while the first dwellings date back to the Neolithic Period, based on the findings unearthed during excavations conducted for the Ilarion Dam that is under construction.

The archaeological site spans an area of more than 455 stremma and this year’s excavations focused on Bronze Age and Neolithic Period findings that include, among others, 81 pottery items, 24 clay statuettes and tools.

The findings will be presented at the 23rd Scientific Meeting on the Archaeological Work in Macedonia and Thrace to be held at Thessaloniki Aristotle University (AUTH). — www.ana-mpa.gr Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

Remains of Seventh Century Arab Palace Discovered in Israel

Posted in News  by antiques

remains-of-seventh-century-arab-palace-discovered-in-israelRuins in northern Israel previously thought to have been a synagogue have now been identified as a 7th century palace used by the Umayyad caliph who started construction of Jerusalem’s Dome of the Rock, archaeologists said on Tuesday.

The site on the shores of the Sea of Galilee is that of the Al-Sinnabra palace, which was described by early Arab historians but whose precise location had long been unknown, according to Tel Aviv University, whose Institute of Archaeology led the recent excavations.

Archaeologists dug up the site in the early 1950s but identified it as the ruins of an ancient synagogue, a theory that was questioned in 2002 by a University of Chicago expert who identified the site as that of the Al-Sinnabra palace.

The latest excavations and research by the Hebrew University in Jerusalem confirmed the site was that of the palace where the Umayyad rulers would spend the winter months. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

Researchers Discover Preserved Medieval Brain of a Child

Posted in News  by antiques

researchers-discover-preserved-medieval-brain-of-a-childScientists were able to identify neurons and cerebral cells from the brain preserved from the 13th century.

An international team of researchers has identified intact neurons and cerebral cells in a mummified medieval brain, according to a study published in the journal Neuroimage.

Found inside the skull of a 13th century A.D. 18-month-old child from northwestern France, the brain had been fixed in formalin solution since its discovery in 1998.

“Although reduced by about 80 percent of its original weight, it has retained its anatomical characteristics and most of all, to a certain degree its cell structures,” anatomist and palaeopathologist Frank Ruhli, head of the Swiss Mummy Project at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, told Discovery News.

The brain was the only tissue preserved in the infant’s skeletonized body. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

Archaeologists Find Maya Site Where Inhabitants Created Weapons

Posted in Maya, News  by antiques

archaeologists-find-maya-site-where-inhabitants-created-weaponsSpecialists from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) explore in Tenosique, Tabasco, an archaeological site of Maya affiliation dedicated exclusively to manufacture weapons and tools.

San Claudio “was occupied from 200 BC to 900 AD by Maya workers at the service of other community of higher hierarchy”, informed archaeologist Jose Luis Romero Rivera, director of the excavation project at the site.

Located in the contact region between Chiapas Mountain Range and Guatemala, this site accounts for quotidian life of ancient Maya population dedicated to weapons and tools manufacture, which were commercialized with other towns.

“One of the main activities at the site was flint exploitation; we have found a great amount of this mineral debris all over the place. Due to its relatively easy manipulation, it was used to create sharp tools such as knives, axes and arrowheads”. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

Maya Used Blue to Decorate Buildings

Posted in Maya, News  by antiques

maya-used-blue-to-decorate-buildingsAn archaeologist reports the ingredients of “Maya Blue” pigment beloved by Central America’s ancients may have been widely mined, not traded as previously suggested.

In the Journal of Archeological Science report, Leslie Cecil of Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas, reports on “palygorskite” minerals, the chief ingredient in the bright and long-lasting pigment, found at the archaeological site of Ixlú in the Petén region of Guatemala.

Maya Blue was widely used by the classic Maya of Central America to decorate buildings and wares, making the cobalt color a signature of the pyramid-building culture.

Rather than emerging from one of seven mines already discovered in Mexico, the mineral traces back to a nearby site in Guatemala, a first sign that the color’s recipe was traded widely outside the Yucatan, and that the ritual burning required to manufacture the pigment also was used by Maya further south as well. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

Archaeologists Dig Up Lotus Temple

Posted in News  by antiques

archaeologists-dig-up-lotus-templeIn Wari-Bateshwar of Narsingdi, archaeologists have recently excavated a 1,400-year-old Lotus Temple, the first proof of flourishing of Buddhism in the region.

The brick-built temple constructed around seventh or eighth century–as evidenced by its structure and the size and shapes of the bricks and other finds excavated at Mandirvita at Dhupirtek of Shibpur in the district–suggests existence of a Buddha Vihara there, they said.

“This is the first ever proof that Buddhism flourished and was practised in Wari-Bateshwar region of Madhupur tract,” said Prof Sufi Mostafizur Rahman, who is leading the excavation team comprised of researchers from archaeological research centre Oitihya Onneswan, teachers and students of archaeology department of Jahangirnagar University.

According to a copper plaque found in 1885 at Ashrafpur, 7km from Mandirvita, King Devakhadga had donated land to four Viharas and Viharikas in the area. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

Study Finds that Our Ancestors Walked Upright 3.6M Years Ago

Posted in News  by antiques

study-finds-that-our-ancestors-walked-upright-36m-years-agoA comparison of ancient and contemporary footprints reveals that our ancestors were strolling much like we do some 3.6 million years ago, a time when they were still quite comfortable spending time in trees, according to a study which will be published in the March 22 issue of the journal PLoS ONE.

Anatomical fossils have given scant confirmation about when our ancestors developed a fully modern gait. Although some researchers have argued that the 4.4 million-year-old ancient human Ardipithecus ramidus (”Ardi”) described in October 2009 was adept at walking on her hind legs, many disagree.

So rather than quibbling over badly crushed—and often missing—fossil bones, the researchers behind the new study turned much of their focus back to the famous Laetoli footprints, which were discovered more than 30 years ago in what is now Tanzania.

Likely left by Australopithecus afarensis, the same species as “Lucy,” these prints show an upright gait, but it has remained controversial just how fluid and modern this creature’s walk would have been. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

Experts Find Jewellery Exported by Gujarat During Harappan Civilisation

Posted in News  by antiques

experts-find-jewellery-exported-by-gujarat-during-harappan-civilisationA large quantity of seals and beads used in making jewellery during the Harappan civilisation were recently found at Kanmer near Bhachau.

The archaeology experts in the state were elated as the discovery proved that Kutch region those days had a production capacity and also a trade link with other parts of India and world, like Himalayan regions and parts of Pakistan, where similar beads have been found.

Studies taken up by state and central archaeology institutes have also shown a trade route covering central Asia, Himalayan areas and Gujarat.

A research paper on the economy of Harappan civilisation and development of smaller centres published in a British journal this month shows how the civilisation spread from Gujarat plains to Himalayan regions and parts of Pakistan in Indus-Saraswati river valley. Read the rest of this entry »