antiques
Best articles about oldest civilizations
23
Mar

Vikings That Lived in Greenland Had More Celtic Blood than Nordic

Posted in News  by antiques

BRITAIN/Norsemen who settled in southern Greenland carried more Celtic than Nordic blood – but they were still decidedly Scandinavian

An analysis of DNA from a Viking gravesite near a 1000 year-old church in southern Greenland shows that those buried there had strong Celtic bloodlines, reported science website Videnskab.dk.

The analysis – performed by Danish researchers on bones from skeletons found during excavations in south Greenland – revealed that the settlers’ Nordic blood was mixed with Celtic blood, probably originating from the British Isles.

Danish archaeologists are currently conducting the first regional study of southern Greenland’s original settlers, whose colonies date back to the year 985. The skeletons disinterred outside the old church also date back to just a few years after that period. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

Our Ancestors Probably Lived 1.2 Million Years Ago

Posted in News  by antiques

our-ancestors-probably-lived-12-million-years-agoFrom the composition of just two human genomes, geneticists have computed the size of the human population 1.2 million years ago from which everyone in the world is descended.

They put the number at 18,500 people, but this refers only to breeding individuals, the “effective” population. The actual population would have been about three times as large, or 55,500.

Comparable estimates for other primates then are 21,000 for chimpanzees and 25,000 for gorillas. In biological terms, it seems, humans were not a very successful species, and the strategy of investing in larger brains than those of their fellow apes had not yet produced any big payoff. Human population numbers did not reach high levels until after the advent of agriculture.

Geneticists have long known that the ancestors of modern humans numbered as few as 10,000 at some time in the last 100,000 years.

The critically low number suggested that some catastrophe, like disease or climate change induced by a volcano, had brought humans close to the brink of extinction. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

Researchers to Begin Revolutionary Analysis of Shakespeare’s Later Life

Posted in News  by antiques

researchers-to-begin-revolutionary-analysis-of-shakespeares-later-lifeA ground-breaking investigation into Shakespeare’s later life is due to start in Stratford-upon-Avon on 26 March 2010, as archaeologists prepare to excavate the remains of Shakespeare’s house in Stratford-upon-Avon, and the public are invited to come along and watch as the latest story about the world’s most famous writer unfolds…

The archaeological dig will take place at New Place, the house that Shakespeare owned for 19 years and occupied at the time of his death in 1616.

The ‘Dig for Shakespeare’ will see a team of archaeologists from Birmingham Archaeology, along with a hardy crew of volunteers, excavate three locations within the grounds of New Place in a dig where visitors will be able to interact with the archaeological team.

A special scaffolding walkway and viewing platform is being installed so that visitors can have a close view of the trenches and will be invited to talk to the archaeologists as they work. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

Viking Town Could Be Found in Thetford

Posted in Vikings  by antiques

viking-town-could-be-found-in-thetfordArchaeologists hope to find signs of an old Viking town during excavations in Norfolk.

The dig at the Anchor Hotel in Bridge Street, Thetford, is being carried out ahead of a possible redevelopment of the area.

The proximity of the Little Ouse river means there is every likelihood of well preserved remains under the car park, Breckland District Council said.

It is expected the work will take up to six weeks, depending on what is found.

Plundered a monastery

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle recorded that a great invading Viking army built a camp at Thetford in 869AD, the council added. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

Archaeologists Find Decapitated Bodies Executed by Vikings

Posted in News  by antiques

archaeologists-find-decapitated-bodies-executed-by-vikingsFifty beheaded young men found in a burial pit last year were probably executed Vikings, archaeologists revealed today.

Teeth samples from 10 of the decapitated warriors discovered in Weymouth, in Dorset, show that they were Scandinavian invaders who fell into the hands of Anglo Saxons.

Dating back to between AD910 and AD1030, the mass war grave is among the largest examples ever found of executed foreigners buried in one spot.

The remains have been analysed by Dr Jane Evans and Carolyn Chenery at NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, part of the British Geological Survey, based in Nottingham.

The isotopes - variations of elements - found in the men’s teeth show that they grew up in countries where the climate is colder than in Britain, with one individual thought to be from north of the Arctic Circle. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

Archaeologists Discover Unique Things in Aiane, Kozani

Posted in News  by antiques

archaeologists-discover-unique-things-in-aiane-kozani1Rare finds, among them the architectural ruins of tombs, pottery and clay statuettes, were brought to light during archeological excavations conducted at the Royal Necropolis in the region of Livadia, near the village of Aiane in the prefecture of Kozani, northwestern Greece.

The land of Aiane is rich in unique and rare archaeological finds, according to the head of the 30th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities in charge of the excavations, referring to recent discoveries that include 25 tombs dating back to the Archaic and Classical Period and 4 tombs of the late Bronze Age.

The latest finds will be presented in the 23rd Scientific Meeting on the Archaeological Work in Macedonia and Thrace to be held at Thessaloniki Aristotle University (AUTH) on Thursday. — www.ana-mpa.gr Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

16th Century Cloister Found in the Monastery of Gerri de la Sal Lleida

Posted in News  by antiques

16th-century-cloister-found-in-the-monastery-of-gerri-de-la-sal-lleidaAs reported by the Department of Culture, the archaeological excavations took place between December and March and has been led by archaeologist Josep Maria Vila.

Archaeologists discover a sixteenth-century cloister in the monastery of Gerri de la Sal Lleida

Archaeological excavations on a site located next to the old church of the Monastery of Santa Maria de Gerri de la Sal has uncovered an ancient cloister that may date to the late sixteenth century. As reported by the Department of Culture, the archaeological excavations took place between December and March and has been led by archaeologist Josep Maria Vila.

The cloister, has an area of about 1,250 square metres, it was covered with debris and vegetation which was at least 4 m higher than the monastery. The traces detected suggest that this was a square courtyard, with covered galleries with ribbed sections made of plaster material that was also used for the arches separating the corridors of the central courtyard. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

Archaeologists Discover Antique Tribal Meeting Ground in Australia

Posted in News  by antiques

archaeologists-discover-antique-tribal-meeting-ground-in-australiaThe 40,000-year-old site may hold the world’s southernmost traces of early human life.

Australian archaeologists have uncovered what they believe to be the world’s southernmost site of early human life, a 40,000-year-old tribal meeting ground, an Aboriginal leader said Wednesday.

The site appears to have been the last place of refuge for Aboriginal tribes from the cannon fire of Australia’s first white settlers, said Michael Mansell of the Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre.

The find came during an archaeological survey ahead of roadwork near Tasmania’s Derwent River and soil dating had established the age of the artifacts found there.

“When the archaeological report came out it showed that (life there) had gone back longer than any other recorded place anywhere else in Tasmania, dating back to 40,000 years,” Mansell told AFP. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

Antique Six-Mouth Well Found in Quanzhou

Posted in News  by antiques

antique-six-mouth-well-found-in-quanzhouThe picture published on Friday, March 19, 2010 shows a well with six mouths recently discovered in Quanzhou, Fujian Province.

A well with an unusual design was recently discovered in Quanzhou, a city in southeast China’s Fujian Province, the website Quanzhou Evening News reports.

The well, which has six mouths and measures 3.4 meters in diameter, was built during the Northern Song Dynasty (960-1127), according to archeologist Liu Zhicheng, who also found some porcelain shards from the period at a nearby construction site.

Liu said a well with six mouths was unusual and reflected a dense population in this area at the time, which to a certain degree indicated the prosperity of ancient Quanzhou. Read the rest of this entry »

23
Mar

The Characteristic of Native American Houses

Posted in News  by antiques

the-characteristic-of-native-american-housesA common characteristic of the mounds and villages constructed by Native Americans prior to the time of the Sweet Potato Village is that very little remains of the buildings.

Even when Europeans began colonizing North America, most indigenous peoples of North America outside the Southwest and Southeast still framed their homes with saplings.

Saplings were much easier to cut with stone tools and were transportable. Often all that archaeologists find at such sites are hearths and the detritus of daily living. Archaeologists assume there was once a hut or teepee, where now there is only a hearth.

Pottery and grinding stones are heavy. They are not something that most people would want to carry around if their camp site was constantly on the move. Read the rest of this entry »